• Preventive Dentistry

  • The main goal of preventive dentistry is to protect oral health against issues that may arise over time. There are a variety of steps that can be taken to reduce the risks of needing restorative care.

    Along with at-home treatments, it is important to visit a dentist regularly. Even with the utmost care and attention paid on the part of the patient, there is no substitute for the knowledge and experience of dental professionals. After over 29 years in the dental industry, Dr. Skowronski has developed a keen sense for recognizing symptoms and warning signs that may turn into issues later on. It is not uncommon for our team of highly skilled professionals to notice an issue that the patient was not aware of.

    Dr. Skowronski takes pride in providing her patients with all the facts on hand. She believes that the best way to prevent issues down the line is through education. With all of your options in front of you, you can then decide what you would like to do to achieve your desired results. Though the choice is yours to make, you are not alone! Dr. Skowronski will answer any questions you may have and educated you on the potential pros and cons of the options.

  • What causes dental decay? Bacteria in the mouth use what you eat and drink as food and produce acids that cause the breakdown of enamel thus forming (holes/cavities) in the surface. If not treated the infection will progress deeper into the tooth causing pain and serious infection. 

    Dental caries (decay) affects more than one-fifth of children ages 2-4, 50% of children 6-8, and 60% of children at age 15. Three out of four children will suffer from dental caries before they graduate from high school. It is the most common childhood disease. 85% of adults have experienced dental caries and 30% have not received treatment. Root caries (decay) affects 50% of adults 75 years or older. That's the bad news.......the good news is that 70% of dental caries is preventable! How? Here are some easy ways:

    Decreasing risk factors:

    Elimination of sugary foods and beverages (pop, energy drinks, sports drinks, processed juices)

    Limit snacking

    Be aware of medications/diseases that decrease your salivary flow

    Avoid dehydration

    Limit bacterial transmission: avoid sharing cups, utensils, or food with other persons

    Increasing Protective factors:

    Improving diet high in fresh fruits, vegetables, and grains

    Practice good oral hygiene measures at least twice daily: Toothbrushing, waterflossing

    Using baking soda rinses to raise oral pH (reduce acidity)

    Using xylitol chewing gums, mints, and candies to decrease bad oral bacteria and biofilm

    Using organic virgin coconut or sesame oil to soothe and impart antibacterial oral effects

    Using probiotics to rebalance oral bacteria